Top 5 Reasons to Visit Dundee and Angus

13-01-2023 5 0 0 0 Báo lỗi

Dundee, Scotland's fourth-largest city, is located near the mouth of the Tay, the country's longest river. The county of Angus is located immediately to the north. Both have beautiful scenery and a rich history and are intimately intertwined. These include significant ties to Scott of the Antarctic's unsuccessful trip to the South Pole in 1912, as well as indelible ties to the world-famous Peter Pan story. Of course, history isn't the only intriguing part of the region. The Dundee and Angus region has everything, from world-class golf courses to breathtaking highlands and majestic castles. Here are the most interesting reasons to visit Dundee and Angus.

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To walk in Scott and Shackleton’s footsteps

Scott and Shackleton's first Antarctic trip were aboard a ship constructed in Dundee. This was the RRS Discovery, and she still stands sentry over the V&A next door on the riverfront here today. It's difficult to think that this slim wooden ship brought 48 men, 23 screaming dogs, and 45 scared sheep south to Antarctica in 1901, in temperatures as low as minus 45 degrees. Don't miss Discovery Walk, a collection of ten bronze plaques in the refurbished waterfront that honor Dundee's gifts to the world, including the Dandy and Beano.


The ultimate Antarctic expedition to the heart of Antarctica. The Ross Sea is one of the world's most isolated places, accessible only for two months each year when the ice melts. Sir James Clark Ross found the entrance in 1842, and it is steeped in history. Many of history's greatest notable explorers and adventurers traveled to the Ross Sea region. Borchgrevink, Scott, Shackleton, Amundsen, Richard Byrd, Sir Edmund Hillary, and others were among them.

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For the arts

Along with the V&A, there is much to keep art aficionados interested in Dundee. For starters, the city is home to the country's sole permanent performing ensemble, the Dundee Rep. They share a home with the Scottish Dance Theatre, and there is a full program of world-class performances all year. The DCA, Dundee Contemporary Arts, is almost next door. Visit the temporary exhibitions or catch a screening of an arthouse film. The McManus, a splendid sandstone Victorian Gothic structure dedicated to the region's riches, is every Dundonian's favorite arts center. Sweep up the spiral staircase to galleries containing everything from old Pictish stones to the Tay Whale skeleton.


Edzell Castle and Gardens are popular among garden enthusiasts because of the spectacular walled garden designed by Sir David Lindsay in 1604. The Pleasance is a formal garden filled with flower boxes and stone panels. Visit Barry Mill in Carnoustie for a taste of the simpler life in Angus. It's a rare, operating grain mill surrounded by picnic tables that was purchased by the National Trust in 1988.

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For fab Scottish food

Although Edinburgh is the only Scottish city with a Michelin star (or four), Dundee can hold its own when it comes to innovative modern cuisine. Castlehill, where chef Graham Campbell prepares the best of Scotland's larder, is the greatest location to eat in the city center. Consider Shetland scallops with cauliflower and caramel sauce, or Highland venison with Douglas fir jus. Former Masterchef: The Professionals champion Jamie Scott's tasting menu at The Newport Restaurant in Newport varies every day. Small dishes are the order of the day here, and with prices starting at £3.50, you can afford to be daring.


It's no surprise that the Angus seaside towns have excellent seafood, none more so than Arbroath, with its famed smokie - a chunk of moreish smoked haddock. The Smokies started in the modest fishing community of Auchmithie, a few miles north of Arbroath. Fishwives here smoked the fish in half barrels, confining the smoke behind layers of hessian sacking. Peel Farm is a farmhouse kitchen north of Alyth that is a frequent stop for bikers. Breakfast specialties at The Coffee Shop include Peel Farm sausage with free-range scrambled eggs and beans on toast. The Wee Bear Café in Lochside is an excellent break before or after exploring the Angus Glens, with views out to the misty loch and a wood burner for home cooking and baking.

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To visit Scotland’s birthplace

Arbroath Abbey's warm red sandstone remains are more than simply the bones of a majestic 12th-century abbey - here is holy land. In 1320, a charter was written here that openly stated Scotland's resolve to be independent of England forever. The Declaration of Arbroath is considered Scotland's birth certificate and served as the inspiration for the American Declaration of Independence. This tradition inspired the four students who stole the Stone of Destiny (the stone upon which all Scottish kings were crowned) from Westminster Abbey in 1950 to restore it to Arbroath Abbey.


The Declaration of Independence was composed in Latin and signed by eight earls and forty barons. Various copies and translations have been created throughout the years, including a tiny edition. The Declaration of Independence was made during the protracted battle of independence with England, which began in 1296 with Edward I's effort to capture Scotland. When Alexander III and his granddaughter Margaret, Maid of Norway died, leaving Scotland without a ruler, Edward exploited the offer to assist in the selection of a successor as an opportunity to resurrect English claims of overlordship.

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For royal history

In the heart of Angus stands one of Scotland's finest castles. Glamis Castle is connected with both real and imagined monarchy as the Queen Mother's childhood home and the fictitious abode of Shakespeare's Macbeth. But it's this 14th-century dame's spectacular architecture, complete with turrets and towers, and stunning gardens that make her so endearing. The inside can only be seen on a guided tour, but it's definitely worth it: you'll hear stories about everyone from Mary Queen of Scots to Old Pretender James VIII, and you'll get to explore around the hallways and royal rooms, admiring magnificent fireplaces and valuable paintings.


The castle is a category A listed building, and the grounds are listed on the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, Scotland's national list of noteworthy gardens. The clock tower holds the castle's archives, which include a wealth of historical information about the castle and the Bowes and Lyon families. A papal edict and Mary Eleanor Bowes' memoirs are among them. The Glamis archives are closely linked to the University of Dundee's archives, and scholars who seek to study information kept in the Glamis Castle Archive do so in the University's search room.

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