Top 12 Best Things to Do in Ireland

05-01-2023 12 3 0 0 Báo lỗi

Ireland is by certainly one of the most intriguing tourism locations in Europe. It is a country rich in grand history, lively culture, and natural beauty. And, whatever you decide to do on your Ireland vacation, every place will fascinate, amaze, and inspire the curious traveler. There is so much to see and do on this magnificent Celtic Island that a visit will be well worth it. Let's discover the best things to do in Ireland now.

1 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Road trip around the Wild Atlantic Way

The Wild Atlantic Way is a tourist route that runs along Ireland's west coast as well as sections of its north and south coastlines. The 2,500-kilometer (1,553-mile) drive spans nine counties and three provinces, from County Donegal's Inishowen Peninsula in Ulster to Kinsale, County Cork, in Munster, on the Celtic Sea coast. There are 157 discovery spots, 1,000 sights, and over 2,500 activities along the path. These routes have long been popular with residents and visitors alike for years, even before they were dubbed The Wild Atlantic Way Route. The road provides extremely stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean as well as locations to visit.


It will be difficult to plan an itinerary with so many hidden jewels along this road. If you want to avoid tourist favorites like the Cliffs of Moher, head to Fanad Head in Donegal instead. Climb the 76 stairs at Fanad Head Lighthouse for the best perspective of the untamed Atlantic Ocean. Rather than trying to pack everything into a few days, we believe it is more vital to calm down and allow the beauty of this lovely nation heal your spirit. Even though Ireland is a tiny nation, getting around and making memories takes time.


Location: Wild Atlantic Way, The Atlantic Coast of Ireland Galway Galway

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2 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Indulge in a seaweed bath

Monks used to gather seaweed and feed it to the impoverished as early as the 12th century. Bathhouses began to spring up in the early twentieth century as people realized the benefits of seaweed in relieving rheumatism and arthritis. Although there aren't as many seaweed baths as there once were, you may still bathe your tired bones in a few traditional ones along Ireland's west coast. Kilcullen's Seaweed Baths, located in the picturesque seaside village of Enniscrone, is one such location. The Kilcullen Family has owned the spa for almost 100 years, and it is set in a stunning Edwardian structure with enormous porcelain tubs with solid brass taps and paneled wooden shower cisterns that give it an old-school character.


Voya Seaweed Baths, a trendy spa and organic skincare company based on sustainably hand-harvested seaweed, is located in Strandhill. It also offers merchandise so that customers may recreate the experience at home. Collins' Seaweed Baths overlooks the Ladies Beach in Ballybunion, County Kerry.


Location: Helbhic Head Ring Waterford

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3 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Eat your way around Kinsale

Kinsale is a historic port and fishing town in Ireland's County Cork. It is located around 25 kilometers (16 miles) south of Cork City on the southeast coast at the Old Head of Kinsale, at the mouth of the river Bandon, and has a population of 5,281 during the summer when tourism is at its highest. Kinsale is a popular tourist site for both Irish and international visitors. The town is well-known for its restaurants, notably the Michelin-starred Bastion, and it hosts many annual gourmet food events.


Kinsale, a Norman fishing port that means "Head of the Sea", has evolved into Ireland's gourmet capital. This gastronomic wonderland is packed with superb restaurants that promote local food producers and craftsmen, such as Fishy Fishy, the Black Pig, and Cru. It also holds Ireland's oldest culinary festival, the Kinsale Gourmet Festival, which began in 1976. Kinsale not only has some of the greatest food in Ireland, but it also has colorful architecture and the towering defensive walls of the majestic yet haunted Charles Fort. This is an excellent location for viewing the port and surrounding landscape.


Location: Munster, Ireland

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4 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Tour the House of Waterford Crystal

A visit to the House of Waterford will let you to see some stunning ancestral crystal items come to life before your eyes. Waterford Crystal, which has been manufacturing crystal for over 240 years, was founded in 1783 by William and George Penrose. Visitors will be taken on a voyage through the crystal-making process, witnessing highly experienced craftsmen succeed at the many methods and instruments, from glassblowing to the final engraving, throughout the guided tour. While the majority of the crystals are manufactured elsewhere, the high-end trademark pieces are crafted on-site. When you're done with the city, head to the shore. Waterford has some of the nicest off-the-beaten-path beaches in the country.


When you arrive to the House of Waterford Crystal and are ready to begin your tour, have a look behind the scenes at the plant. Waterford Crystal is one of the few firms that still practices the ancient technique of mold building, and a tour of the plant reveals that little has changed over the years. First, visit the casting room to see blowers form molten crystal using wooden molds and hand tools. Then, proceed to the blowing department, where you can observe incandescent balls of crystal being passed through a 1300°F furnace. Following their time in the furnace, each item is meticulously carved, sculpted, and etched.


Location: The Mall Waterford X91 Waterford

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5 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Take a Cruise on the River Shannon

When it comes to river cruises, Ireland is a place that is guaranteed to tick a lot of boxes regardless of the sort of vacation you are looking for. The River Shannon is the most popular Irish river cruise destination. A Shannon River tour takes you through Ireland's heart and history. Forts, aristocratic estates, and monastic villages may be found along the Shannon. You'll learn about local myths, stories, fables, and folklore, as well as the friendly and inviting Irish people. As for the view, too, with beautiful green vistas of rolling meadows, you'll soon understand why Ireland is dubbed 'The Emerald Isle'.


The most navigable sections are from Limerick to Northern Ireland's Lower Lough Erne. There is nothing more peaceful than a boat ride on the Shannon. Beautiful scenery along the 500km of river will be the highlight of your journey. The most popular routes are from Portumna to Carrick, where boats of various sizes may be rented. Many more hidden jewels may be located farther north for those who desire to extend their river experience. All along the River Shannon, there are plenty of fishing hotspots and coarse angling areas. There are different permit requirements for fishing in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, so please check what, if any, licence you need before you start fishing.


Location: Dunshaughlin Business Park, Dunshaughlin Co. Meath

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6 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Explore Blarney Castle

Cormac MacCarthy, one of Ireland's finest chieftans, built it about 600 years ago, and it has drawn attention ever since. Millions of people have visited Blarney over the last few centuries, making it an international landmark and one of Ireland's greatest assets. Though older defences were on the same site, the present keep was erected in 1446 by the MacCarthy of Muskerry dynasty, a cadet line of the Kings of Desmond.


The castle was erected before 1200, when a wooden house was said to have been built on the site, but little evidence of this survives. This was rebuilt about 1210 with a stone fortification. It was demolished in 1446 but rebuilt by Cormac Láidir MacCarthy, Lord of Muscry, who also constructed castles at Kilcrea and Carrignamuck. During the Irish Confederate Wars, the fortress was attacked and conquered in 1646 by Parliamentarian forces led by Lord Broghill. However, during the Restoration, the castle was returned to Donough MacCarty, who was elevated to the rank of 1st Earl of Clancarty.


Blarney Castle is currently a partial ruin, with several halls and battlements still accessible. The Stone of Eloquence, sometimes known as the Blarney Stone, is located at the summit of the castle. Visitors to the castle can hang upside-down over a precipitous drop to kiss the stone, which is claimed to bestow the gift of eloquence. There are other theories about the stone's origin, including the notion that it was the Lia Fáil, a numinous stone upon which Irish monarchs were crowned.


Location: Cork, Ireland

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7 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Visit Bend of the Boyne, County Meath

Bend of the Boyne is a historically significant place not just in Ireland, but also in Europe. This enormous megalithic structure predates even the Egyptian pyramids, and its roots may be dated back to the 32nd century BC during the Neolithic period. Bend of the Boyne has been declared a World Heritage Site due to its rich history. The most outstanding feature of this attraction is how it was constructed. It has a variety of chamber tombs, standing stones, henges, and burial passages built from a baffling knowledge of astronomy and physics that humans in the past could not possible have known without divine guidance (or assistance from aliens and computers).


This is how clever the Bend of the Boyne's construction is, and you'll have to see it for yourself to believe it. Every year on the winter solstice, a beam of light spans the length of the Newgrange passage burial, which is a spectacle not to be missed. Every year, an estimated 200,000 people gather to view this one-of-a-kind sighting, with each tour bringing just a maximum of 15 individuals into the tomb at any given moment.


Location: Stalleen, Donore, County Meath

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8 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Explore Killarney National Park

Killarney National Park is one of the greatest places in Ireland to reconnect with nature. This is the only site in the world where you may watch red deer gazing quietly in the wild. The 100,000-acre park is also home to 141 bird species, and if you enjoy fishing, the glacial Lower Lake (or Lough Leane.) thrives with trout, salmon, and perch. It is home to the only red deer herd on continental Ireland and has the most extensive coverage of natural woodland in Ireland. The park has great ecological significance due to the excellent quality, diversity, and extent of many of its habitats, as well as the large range of species that it supports, some of which are uncommon.


In 1981, the park was named a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. The park is part of a Special Conservation Area and a Special Protection Area. As you walk around the park, you will be rewarded with views of distant mountain ranges, lush moorlands, parks, gardens, and rumbling creeks. Visit the Ring of Kerry for the greatest landscapes in Ireland. The Torc Waterfall, Roos Castle, Ogham Stones, Gap of Dunloe, and the Stone Pillars are among the attractions along this path. The region around Iveragn Peninsula, in particular, features some breathtaking landscapes stretching over 170 kilometers.


Location: Killarney National Park Cork Road Killarney, County Kerry

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9 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Visit Guinness Storehouse, Dublin

Head to the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin for the ultimate beer sampling experience. At first appearance, the renovated fermentation factory will undoubtedly attract your attention. It has up to seven levels and is surrounded by a glass atrium shaped like a giant pint of Guinness. The Guinness Storehouse, however, has much more to offer than its distinctive architectural attractiveness. During your tour, you'll learn about the delicate skill of malting, fermenting, and just about everything else related to beer production.


The Storehouse has seven levels and is surrounded by a glass atrium designed like a pint of Guinness. The first level presents the beer's four constituents (water, barley, hops, and yeast) as well as Arthur Guinness, the brewery's founder. Other levels include an interactive display on responsible drinking as well as a history of Guinness promotion. The Gravity Bar is located on the seventh story, with views of Dublin and a pint of Guinness included in the ticket charge.


Knowledgeable tour guides will even explain barrel manufacturing, an old technique passed down from generation to generation. The tour ends at the lovely Gravity Bar on the top floor where you can relish a panoramic view of Dublin while sipping a chilled glass of 100% original Guinness.


Location: St. James Gate Dublin 8 D

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10 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Visit the Mourne Mountains, County Down

It would be a shame to miss out seeing the Mourne Mountains while traveling across Ireland. The granite mountain range is located in Northern Ireland, especially in County Down to the south. It's an area of breathtaking natural beauty and one of the best spots to go trekking. You may rent a bike and enjoy a fresh perspective of the hilly scenery on two wheels if you wish to cover more territory without walking for kilometers. There are also several granite cliffs in the form of outcrops and tors spread across the range. The cliffs are ideal for rock climbing.


It's simple to understand why the Mournes are one of Ireland's favorite walking locations. The network of pathways and tracks that span this mountain range is tough for the faint of heart, but the vistas of valleys, lakes, rivers, and reservoirs make the effort worthwhile. This section is quite steep in places and should only be tackled by experienced hikers. The ascent to the peak is hard, but well worth it for the superb views of the County Down coast, Newcastle town, and Murlough Dunes - and on a clear day, Scrabo Tower and the Isle of Man.


Location: 6 Leitrim Road, Hilltown, Newry BT34 5XS

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11 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Explore Holy Cross Abbey, Tipperary

Holly Cross Abbey is a popular wedding venue. The monastery is a Cistercian monastery and one of Ireland's most popular pilgrimage locations. Holy Cross Abbey and the hallowed relic of the True Cross became a medieval pilgrimage site, as well as a rallying point for the destitute and victims of religious persecution during the Protestant Reformation. It attracted a complaint from Sir Henry Sidney, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, to Queen Elizabeth I in 1567 as a symbol and motivation for the defense of the Catholic religion, resistance, and the battle for independence.


If you've opted to marry in the country, Holy Cross Abbey is the perfect setting to exchange vows and seek God's favor. If you don't want to be married and instead prefer to tour old historical monuments, The Abbey is still worth a visit. This historic edifice, set amid lush vegetation, goes back to the 12th century, yet much of it has survived. You may explore the monastery and learn about its rich spiritual tradition while seeing the interior mural paintings and beautiful sculptures.


Location: Holycross Road Thurles E41, County Tipperary

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12 Trần Thị Thùy Trang

Hike the Dingle Peninsula

The Dingle Peninsular, located at the foot of Slievanea Mountain and strategically situated on a natural port, is one of Ireland's most beautiful natural beauties. Dingle Peninsula gets its name from the town of Dingle. Even when people are speaking in English, the peninsula is also known as Corca Dhuibhne (Corcu Duibne). Corca Dhuibhne, which meaning "spawn or tribe of Duibhne" (a Goddess, a Gaelic clan name), gets its name from the Corco Dhuibhne tath (people, nation) who occupied the peninsula in the Middle Ages and also ruled a number of lands in County Kerry's south and east. It is also the westernmost point on the island and in Europe.


The adjacent town is full of shops, bars, and restaurants, all with a distinct Irish flavor. Dolphin cruises from the Dingle Peninsula are extremely regular, and you can also set sail from here to visit the adjacent Blasket Islands. There are several other sites to see in Dingle, including Rahinnane Castle, Oceanworld, the Eask Tower, and Conors Pass.


Location: Kerry, Ireland

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