Top 8 Great Bodhisattvas in Buddhist Culture

09-08-2022 8 13 0 0 Báo lỗi

The goal of bodhisattvas is the enlightenment of all beings. Buddhist literature and art contain countless transcendent bodhisattvas, but these are some of the most significant.

1 Thu Bui

Avalokiteshvara

The most well-known Mahayana Buddhist deity is Avalokitesvara, also known as Chinese Guanyin, Japanese Kannon, and the Bodhisattva of Infinite Compassion and Mercy. The qualities of Karuna that Avalokiteshvara symbolizes include compassion, active sympathy, and soft attachment. The traditional translations of the name Avalokiteshvara are "The Lord Who Looks Down in Pity" or "The One Who Hears the Cries of the World."


Avalokiteshvara, who is occasionally depicted as Amitabha's assistant, also stands for the Buddha Amitabha's power in the world. Between the passing of the historical Buddha, Gautama, and the appearance of the future Buddha, Maitreya, he is Amitabha's earthly form, keeping watch over the world. The fourth world, the actual live universe, was made by him.


Avalokiteshvara can appear in works of art as either a man, a woman, or as genderless. She is known as Guanyin (Kuan Yin) in China and Kannon in Japan in her female form. He joins Amitabha and the bodhisattva Mahasthamaprapta to form a ruling triumvirate for practitioners of Pure Land Buddhism. He is known as Chenrezig in Tibetan Buddhism, and the Dalai Lama is thought to be his incarnation.

The bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, 1800–1900.  Tibet. Thangka; colors on cotton. Courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, Gift of the Friends of Richard Davis, 1988.34.
The bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, 1800–1900. Tibet. Thangka; colors on cotton. Courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, Gift of the Friends of Richard Davis, 1988.34.
Free Buddhist Audio
2 Thu Bui

Manjushri

Manjushri, often written Manjusri, is a Hindu name that means "He Who Is Noble and Gentle." His name, which also goes by the names Mãnjughoṣa ("Sweet Voice") and Vāgīśvara ("Lord of Speech"), means "gentle, or sweet, splendor" in Sanskrit. He goes by the names Wen-shu Shih-li in China, Monju in Japan, and Jam-dpal in Tibet. This bodhisattva stands for wisdom and consciousness. Manjushri recognizes the nondual character of all occurrences by seeing into their essence. He is conscious of his limitless nature. Although he was the subject of sutras (Buddhist scriptures) by at least AD 250, he does not appear to have been depicted in Buddhist art until AD 400.


Manjushri is frequently portrayed as a young person in art, signifying innocence and purity. He frequently has a sword in his hand. This is the vajra sword, which pierces discrimination and ignorance. He frequently holds a sutra scroll with the Prajnaparamita (perfection of wisdom) writings in his other hand or close to his head. He can be resting on a lotus or riding a lion, signifying the courage and majesty of a ruler. His skin is typically shown in paintings as being yellow.


In the eighth century, his cult became quite popular in China, and Mount Wu-t'ai in Shansi province, where he is revered, is covered in temples. Even though he is typically thought of as a celestial bodhisattva, certain traditions give him a human past. He is claimed to appear in a variety of forms, including dreams, pilgrims on his holy mountain, the Tibetan reformer Atīśa, the Chinese emperor, and the monk Vairocana, who brought Buddhism to Khotan.

Orange Manjushri with his sword of wisdom that “cuts through delusions.” - buddhaweekly.com
Orange Manjushri with his sword of wisdom that “cuts through delusions.” - buddhaweekly.com
A beautiful thangka of Lord Manjushri by Jampay Dorje. - buddhaweekly.com
A beautiful thangka of Lord Manjushri by Jampay Dorje. - buddhaweekly.com
3 Thu Bui

Maitreya

The Sanskrit word maitrī, which means "kindness," is whence Maitreya gets its name. The bodhisattva is known as Metteyya in Pali, Milefo in Chinese, Miroku in Japanese, and Maidari in Mongolian; Byams-pa ("Kind" or "Loving") in Tibetan. His devotion was particularly well-liked between the fourth and the seventh centuries. His representations can be seen all over the Buddhist world, and many of them beautifully capture his distinctive air of expectation and promise. Both as a bodhisattva and as a Buddha, he is shown in painting and sculpture. He is commonly seen sitting in a European-style chair or with his ankles casually crossed.


The future Buddha is referred to as Maitreya in the context of Buddhist eschatology. The fifth Buddha, Maitreya Buddha, is thought to have appeared during this Kalpa era. Therefore, Maitreya Buddha is regarded as the Future Buddha who has not yet manifested in this era. Maitreya Buddha is thought to go by the name Ajita in a number of Buddhist texts, including the Amitabha Sutra and the Lotus Sutra.


According to Buddhist history and tradition, Maitreya Buddha is thought to be a Bodhisattva who will manifest on Earth in the future, attain Nirvana, and impart the pure Dharma to its inhabitants in a manner similar to Shakyamuni Buddha. The living Buddha, Gautama Buddha, will be succeeded by Maitreya Buddha, according to both Buddhist writings and scriptures. In many Buddhist nations, the prophecy of Maitreya Buddha returning to the physical world is written in the majority of the major schools of Buddhism.


Numerous Maitreya Buddha statues and Buddha images are displayed with various features, hand mudras, and poses. The statues of Maitreya Buddha are depicted with all the qualities that a Bodhisattva must possess. The majority of Maitreya Buddha statues are portrayed with both hands in the Dharmachakra Mudra. The statues also show Maitreya Buddha holding a lotus flower in each hand. Each hand also included a ritual base and a Wheel of Dharma. On the summit of the lotus flower, the Wheel of Dharma and the ritual vase are both shown. The dharma wheel perched above the lotus flower symbolizes Maitreya Buddha's emphasis on his goal of disseminating and imparting the Dharma to all sentient beings. Shakyamuni Buddha was born in a high caste household, according to Buddhist history, whereas the ritual vase on the top of the lotus indicates that Maitreya Buddha would be.


In Chinese Buddhism, the Laughing Buddha is represented as the following Maitreya Buddha. The next Matreya Buddha is predicted to be the Laughing Buddha, who is also said to be a Bodhisattva. There are many Buddha statues that depict Maitreya Buddha, but Laughing Buddha is among the most well-known in the entire world because of his chubby tummy and happy expression.

originalbuddhas.com
originalbuddhas.com
Maitreya Buddha - Thangka Paintings
Maitreya Buddha - Thangka Paintings
4 Thu Bui

Vajrapani

One of the first bodhisattvas in Mahayana Buddhism is Vajrapaṇi. He rose to represent the might of the Buddha and serves as the Buddha's defender and advisor. As one of the three defenders of the Buddha, Vajrapani was frequently depicted in Buddhist iconography. Manjusri (the manifestation of all the Buddhas' wisdom), Avalokitesvara (the manifestation of all the Buddhas' compassion), and Vajrapani (the manifestation of all the Buddhas' might) each stand for a different virtue of the Buddha. Additionally, Vajrapani is one of the oldest Dharmapalas and a rare Buddhist deity that is revered in Tibetan Buddhism, Pure Land Buddhism, and even the early Zen Buddhism of the Shaolin Temple (where he is known as Mahasthamaprapta). The Dharma protectors known as Nio can also be found in many Japanese Buddhist temples as manifestations of Vajrapani.

Vajrapani
is depicted in a frenzied dance while surrounded by a halo of flames, which stands for transformation. In his right hand, he is holding a vajra (thunderbolt), emphasizing his ability to pierce the mist of illusion. Vajrapani appears angry, yet he is actually a symbol of the enlightened mind, which is entirely devoid of anger.

Vajrapani
's name, sandwiched between the mystic syllables Om and Hm, which signifies "wielder of the thunderbolt," serves as his mantra. This mantra enables us to tap into the unstoppable energy that Vajrapani represents. Of course, it helps to be familiar with Vajrapani, even though the mantra's tone is already quite energizing.

Wrathful Vajrapani surrounded by wisdom flames. In both wrathful and peaceful forms he is irresistibly powerful. - buddhaweekly.com
Wrathful Vajrapani surrounded by wisdom flames. In both wrathful and peaceful forms he is irresistibly powerful. - buddhaweekly.com
Vajrapani - Wikipedia
Vajrapani - Wikipedia
5 Thu Bui

Mahasthamaprapta

A bodhisattva mahsattva named Mahāsthāmaprāpta embodies the force of wisdom. Literally translated, his name means "coming of the tremendous strength."


Mahāsthāmaprāpta, together with Mañjuśrī, Samantabhadra, Avalokitesvara, Ākāśagarbha, Kṣitigarbha, Maitreya, and Sarvanivarana-Vishkambhin, is one of the Eight Great Bodhisattvas in the Mahayana school of Buddhism.


In Chinese Buddhism, Mahasthamaprapta is occasionally depicted as Shih Chih, a woman who resembles Avalokiteśvara. In the Japanese school of Shingon Buddhism, he is also one of the Thirteen Buddhas. In Tibetan Buddhism, Vajrapani, one of Mahsthmaprpta's incarnations who was referred to as the Protector of Gautama Buddha, is equated with Mahāsthāmaprāpta.


One of the most senior bodhisattvas, Mahasthamaprapta is revered for his strength, particularly in the Pure Land school where he plays a significant part in the Longer Sukhāvatīvyūha Sūtra. Particularly in Pure Land Buddhism, he is frequently seen as a triad with Amitābha and Avalokiteśvara (Guanyin).


Mahsthmaprpta describes how he attained enlightenment by the practice of nianfo, or continual pure mindfulness of Amitabha, in the Śūraṅgama Sūtra. The moon represents Mahsthmaprpta in the Amitayurdhyana Sutra, while the sun represents Avalokitesvara.


In the Lotus Sutra's Introductory Chapter, Mahāsthāmaprāpta is among the 80,000 bodhisattva mahāsattvas who gather on Mount Gṛdhrakūṭa to hear the Buddha proclaim the Wonderful Dharma of the Lotus Flower Sutra. In chapter 20 of the Lotus Sutra, the Buddha also addresses Mahsthmaprpta, telling him about the Buddha's previous life as the Bodhisattva Sadāparibhūta ("Never Despising"), a monk who was abused and reviled by arrogant monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen when he paid them respect by saying they would all become Buddhas. The Buddha explains to Mahāsthāmaprāpta how these haughty people were chastised but are now bodhisattvas in the assembly on the path to Enlightenment. The Buddha then extols the Lotus Sutra's enormous power, saying, “O Mahāsthāmaprāpta, know that this Lotus Sutra will greatly benefit the bodhisattva mahāsattvas and lead them to highest, complete enlightenment. For this reason, after the Tathāgata’s parinirvāṇa the bodhisattva mahāsattvas should always preserve, recite, explain, and copy this sutra.”

Great Bodhisattvas - Buddha
Great Bodhisattvas - Buddha
Mahāsthāmaprāpta - Buddhism - Red Zambala
Mahāsthāmaprāpta - Buddhism - Red Zambala
6 Thu Bui

Samantabhadra

Samantabhadra, one of the principal Bodhisattvas, is a famous Bodhisattva associated with Buddhist practice and meditation in Mahayana Buddhism. Samantabhadra literally translates as "Universal Virtue," "Universal Worthy," or "He Who Is All-Pervadingly Good." Bodhisattva Samantabhadra, also known as Fugen in Japan and P'u-hsein in China, is sometimes represented as a bodhisattva who protects all beings who teach Dharma. In the Buddhist tradition, Samantabhadrais are depicted alongside Shakyamuni Buddha and bodhisattva Manjushri, forming the Shakyamuni Trinity.


Samantabhadra is represented as a Bodhisattva clad in grandeur, holding a lotus leaf "Parasol" and riding an elephant with six tusks. The elephant's six tusks indicate six senses or occasionally six sense organs (ear, eye, nose, tongue, body, and mind). Samantabhadra is the primordial Buddha in the Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism.


Bodhisattva Samantabhadra is occasionally shown alone in Mahayana Buddhism and is considered the counterpart of another Bodhisattva Manjushri. They can be seen together in the Shakyamuni Trinity. In the Shakyamuni Trinity, Samantabhadra is depicted riding on an elephant and bearing a Lotus leaf, sword, or wish-fulfilling jewel. Samantabhadra is sometimes pictured riding three elephants or one elephant with six tusks. These six tusks also symbolize the Six Paramitas or Perfections. Charity, morality, patience, labor, reflection, and Wisdom are among them. And the Bodhisattva Manjushri is represented on Shakyamuni's left side, with Buddha in the center of the Shakyamuni Trinity. In Chinese art, Bodhisattva Samantabhadra is depicted with feminine traits and attire similar to Kuan Jin. Samantabhadra is revered in China, particularly on Mount Emei, which is the Bodhimanda of Samantabhadra.


In Vajrayana or Esoteric Buddhism, as well as in the majority of Tibetan Buddhist schools, Samantabhadra is represented as a Buddha rather than a Bodhisattva. Samantabhadra is revered as the primal Buddha in several Tibetan Buddhist lineages.

“Samantabhadra is not subject to limits of time, place, or physical conditions. Samantabhadra is not a colored being with two eyes, etc. Samantabhadra is the unity of awareness and emptiness, the unity of appearances and emptiness, the nature of mind, natural clarity with unceasing compassion - that is Samantabhadra from the very beginning” – Chinese Monk Moheyan.

Samantabhadra (Bodhisattva) - Wikipedia
Samantabhadra (Bodhisattva) - Wikipedia
Twitter
Twitter
7 Thu Bui

Kshitigarbha

Kshitigarbha, (Sanskrit: "Womb of the Earth") bodhisattva ("buddha-to-be") who, though recognized in India as early as the 4th century CE, became enormously popular in China as Dicang and in Japan as Jizō. He is the oppressed's savior, the dying's savior, and the dreamer of wicked dreams, for he has pledged not to rest until he has saved the souls of all the dead consigned to hell. He is regarded as the overlord of hell in China and is called when someone is going to die. In Japan, as Jizō, he does not reign over hell (as Emma-ō) but is revered for the mercy he provides the departed, particularly to dead infants, including aborted fetuses. His popularity in Central Asia is evidenced by his frequent appearance on temple banners from Chinese Turkistan.

Kshitigarbha
is most usually shown as a shaved-headed monk with a nimbus and an urna (tuft of hair) between his brows. He is shown with the clerical staff (khakkara), which he uses to push open the gates of hell, as well as the fiery pearl (chintamani), which he uses to light up the darkness. Because Kshitigarbha has the ability to manifest himself in accordance with the requirements of the sufferer, he is usually depicted, particularly in Japan, in six forms, each of which corresponds to one of the six realms of desire.

Bodhisattva Kshitigarbha (Savior of Creatures both in Heaven and Hell) -  국립중앙박물관
Bodhisattva Kshitigarbha (Savior of Creatures both in Heaven and Hell) - 국립중앙박물관
Buddha Weekly
Buddha Weekly
8 Thu Bui

Sarvanivarana Vishkambhin

Bodhisattva Sarvanivarana Vishkambhin is another well-known Bodhisattva mentioned in the Guna Karandavyuha sutra who cleanses followers of all their sins. Sarvanivarana Vishkambhin comes in blue or white. Sarvanivarana Vishkambhin uses his left hand to perform the Bhumisparsa Mudra and his right hand to perform the Santikaran Mudra (thumb and index finger are joined to form a loop). He is also mentioned as being blue in certain places. Sarvanivarana Vishkambhin wields a sword in his right hand and a flag with a Visvavajra in his left.


According to the Guna Karandavyuha sutra, when Buddha Shakyamuni was preparing to give a discourse on this sutra, he sat in an ecstatic Samadhi known as Sarvasansodhana, which means "the purifier of everything." Golden rays of light were seen illuminating the entire province, emanating from an unknown region in that location. Bodhisattva Sarvanivarana was also present at the time. Sarvanivarana was taken aback by this and inquired as to why. Buddha Shakyamuni told him that Lord Avalokiteshvara was teaching for the sinners of Avichi Hell and that the rays would arrive there after purifying the sinners to tame the ignorant and evil-doers. Following that, at the request of Bodhisattva Sarvanivarana, Lord Buddha gave many further discourse sessions about Avalokiteshvara's grandeur and humanitarian deeds, which are detailed in the Guna Karandavyuha sutra.

According to the Swayambhu tradition, Great Odiayana Acharya of Kapilavastu came to Kathmandu to pay respect to Lord Swayambhu. He once meditated on the southern peak in order to develop enormous eight powers (Sanskrit: Astasiddhi). He then performed a fire Puja or Yajna in which live fish were sacrificed (Sanskrit: Matsya Ahuti). Kamadhenu cow, pleased with his act of sacrifice, blessed him and promised that he would soon attain eight amazing powers. In his Sukhavati heaven, Lord Avalokiteshvara realized that Odiyana Acharya was engaging in non-virtuous behavior due to his ignorance. To put an end to this deed, he summoned Bodhisattva Viskambhin and directed him to the location where Odiyana Acharya was meditating. As a result, Bodhisattva Viskambhin intervened and bestowed upon him eight amazing powers. Then, following the instructions of Bodhisattva Vishkambhin, Great Odiayana Acharya did additional austerities and Sadhanas dedicated to Akasha Yogini. Odiyana Acharya continued to pay reverence to this precious boulder as the emanation of Bodhisattva Vishkambhin when Bodhisattva Vishkambhin discharged a stream of light into it. This boulder, known as Phanikeshar Vitaraga, can still be found near Pharping.

SARVA NIRVARANA VISKAMBHIN
SARVA NIRVARANA VISKAMBHIN
Holy Vajrasana Temple & Retreat Center for Meditation
Holy Vajrasana Temple & Retreat Center for Meditation


objective Completely accurate

Is the top 3 criteria that toplist.info always aims to bring the most useful information to the community

Toplist Joint Stock Company
Address: 3rd floor, Viet Tower Building, No. 01 Thai Ha Street, Trung Liet Ward, Dong Da District, Hanoi City, Vietnam
Phone: O369132468 - Tax code: 0108747679
Social network license number 370/GP-BTTTT issued by the Ministry of Information and Communications on September 9, 2019
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use